Archive for June, 2009

Kids Playhouse Piece of Art

June 23, 2009 - 4:54 pm No Comments

For a family vacation we went to Washington DC.  I hadn’t been to The National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden before and was pleasantly surprised when I came across the piece of art that looked like a kids playhouse.  The sculpture was entitled “House I”.  The aluminum sculpture was made by Roy Lichetenstein who was an American (1923 – 1997).  The structure was painted only on one side.  I thought it was interesting and hope you like it as well.

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An Elevated Kids Playhouse

June 12, 2009 - 4:29 pm 6 Comments

I’ve never seen a kids playhouse that was elevated off the ground.  When I asked the parents why they built it that way, they said it was a compromise between a playhouse and treehouse and kind of a cool premise.  Besides, it was similar to what a friend had already built in their backyard so this family went ahead with their own elevated kids playhouse.

I really liked the fact that to get up to the playhouse you had to climb a ladder so it really was geared for kids.  I can already imagine pretending that the kids playhouse was a house boat, pirate ship or an oasis in the clouds.  I guess the point is, having an elevated playhouse seemed to encourage a little more creative play than a traditional, non-elevated playhouse.

The ladder led to a quaint railed deck that had two patio chairs and a small table.  The deck overlooked the backyard.  The parent’s had intended the entrance opposite the ladder to be a fireman’s pole for the kids to slide down.  There were good intentions but the fireman’s pole never was put in place.   

The actual kids playhouse was small, square and had vinyl exterior siding.  It had a full sized screened door and several windows that could be opened.  Being so small, the playhouse only had room for a couch, table and sevral smaller pieces of furniture.  The childen now used the playhouse more for a clubhouse.  Because the playhouse had electricity and the kids had a playstation hooked up to a tv, there were many visitors to the playhouse. So, the door had a lock on it to keep neighborhood children out when the family wasn’t in the playhouse.

Talking about electricity, there had been a mini refrigerator at one time in the kids playhouse stocked with soda.  This idea went over so well with the families children that they were drinking a lot of soda.  The Mom decided that she didn’t want her kids to drink so much soda so the mini refrigerator was removed.

Interestingly, the parent’s had originally wanted to put a loft in the playhouse but it would have taken up too much room so they never built that feature.

Aside from the clubhouse activities the kids enjoy, the Mom uses the playhouse as a get away and admitted to taking naps there!  I guess you could say this playhouse is for all the members of a family!

If you want to check the playhouse out, please click on this link or view the video below.

 

 

 

Please let me know what you think about these playhouses and if there are other questions I should be asking the owners.  I’d love to hear your feedback!

 

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An Awesome Victorian Kids Playhouse

June 11, 2009 - 4:33 pm 2 Comments

I have always admired the Victorian kids playhouse in the neighborhood.  It was built on blocks so that if ever the family moves, the playhouse can be easily moved with the family.  I hadn’t thought of that before but after putting in so much effort, materials and money into the playhouse it’s a great idea.

The kids playhouse is one of the biggest I’ve seen to date.  I didn’t measure it, but I’d guess it was 10 feet wide by 12 feet in length.  There are two attached small areas.  The doors and windows are full size so there’s no problem with transferring the playhouse over to a clubhouse when the kids get older or even a very nice looking storage facility when the kids no longer are interested in the playhouse.

The man that built the playhouse got plans from a book.  He said he didn’t deviate too much from the plans.  Although the exterior was completed, the inside needed to be finished off.  There is electrical power to the playhouse – in fact, all the playhouses (4) I have looked at so far have had electrical power to them.  One thing the man who built the Victorian kids playhouse mentioned was that he planned on putting in a ceiling fan so there was air movement in the playhouse.  If you look at the video, there are motion detector lights on the exterior of the playhouse, entrance lights near the playhouse door and electrical outlets inside the playhouse.

Although he hadn’t gotten to painting the playhouse in a variety of Victorian colors, you sure could tell that the exterior would be fun to detail and customize.  The landscaping around the playhouse was very eye catching, can you imagine what the playhouse will look like once the family paints it?  I may have to go back next summer and update everyone on the progress this family has made on their kids playhouse.

If you want to check out this awesome Victorian kids playhouse, you can click on the link or view the video below.

 

 

 

As always, I look forward to hearing your thoughts on each of the playhouses.  Or, submit your own kids playhouse video!

 

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An Adorable Victorian Kids Playhouse

June 6, 2009 - 12:51 am 5 Comments

I visited a neighbor’s kids playhouse that was built in a Victorian style.  The playhouse was adorable and quaint with wonderful Victorian details.  The playhouse was painted in pink, green, yellow, white and purple.  The sides of the playhouse had a cute stenciled flowing flower pattern done by the Mother.   It was an ideal play structure for any girl wishing to have her own playhouse. 

The parents had initially built the playhouse for their young girl, who at the time, was around 6 years old.  The playhouse originally was designed from a playhouse plan but the design was modified to include a loft on the second floor.  You can get additional ideas here for kids playhouse plans.

The kids playhouse was built in the fenced in backyard, not on a concrete slab but up on blocks. The entire playhouse was made of wood with the exterior of the playhouse detailed in the Victorian style. The owner told me that they had to cut each of the layered wood details by hand but now they were available, precut, from the local hardware store.

There was a cute but small outer porch with the porch railing having window boxes for real flowers to grow in. There were 2 steps to get up to the porch before entering the door.  In retrospect, one thing the owners would have changed looking back was putting in a door that was higher in height.  The current door was only about 4 feet in height.  The reason for the change in door height was the daughter was 12 years old now and the door was difficult to get in and out.

Four sliding windows with screens attached were added for light and ventilation. These windows were added to three sides of the first floor.  A large, eight sided window was added to the second floor loft area.  All the windows allowed for a bright and airy feel to the playhouse and the type of windows were small and could easily be opened and closed by a child.  The octangular window could not be opened.  The wall immediately across from the door entrance did not have any windows, which actually made it easy to put furniture, kitchen sets or bulletin boards against it without problem.

The first floor was small, 10 feet wide and 4 feet in depth, and quite adequate for smaller kids.  However, it was a tight fit if older girls were to congregate in a ‘club house’.  The loft area was accessible by ladder.  The loft area covered half of the upper level of the kids playhouse and was really exciting to be in.  The large 6 sided window gave a child a wide view of the backyard and the small size of the loft area was cozy.  What a wonderful place to pass the time with your friends!

Although the kids playhouse was meant initially for their 6 year old daughter, the playhouse grew to be a club house for girls and now was used by the daughter to do homework and as a kids artist studio.

You can view a video of this kids playhouse here or below.

 

 

 

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Kids Playhouse Memories From Grandma

June 1, 2009 - 8:15 pm No Comments

I was home this weekend and had a conversation with my Mom regarding a kids playhouse.  I wanted to know if she had a playhouse when she was a kid growing up in the Midwest and whether she had fond memories to share.  She started to tell me about how her father turned an old chicken coop into her playhouse.  I ran to get my flip video to record the conversation.

 

My grandparents were quite old when they had my Mother.  My Grandmother passed away when I was little and we lived far away from my Grandfather so hearing stories about my mother and her kids playhouse was fascinating.  Even to her grown up daughter! 

 

It’s funny how you don’t think about your parents being kids.  You hear some stories and then after awhile the stories are forgotten or are vague recollections.  So I was really happy when I was smart enough to stop her reminiscing, get the video recorder and begin taping her fond memories of her playhouse. 

 

Her memories of her playhouse and how special it was to her are obvious.  It was also apparent how much she appreciated her parents for building, decorating and putting those special touches on her playhouse.  After all these years, a grown woman with grandchildren fondly recalling her special kids playhouse was endearing and touching.  If you’d like to hear the 3 minutes clip, please click on the link below. 

 

You will find her story about her brother and his ‘hoodlum friends’ funny. 

 

Perhaps you have your own kids playhouse story to share?  We would love to know if you have any fond or lasting memories about your own playhouse.  Please feel free to post and share your story on this blog (www.kidsplayhouseblog.com) right now before it becomes just another faded memory.

 

 

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